Articles in category: open data

The fastest speaker of the Amsterdam City Council

25 February 2018 - I’ve downloaded the reports of 205 city council meetings (as well as 1,116 council committee meetings) from the website of the City of Amsterdam. They contain over 38 thousand text fragments spoken by council members. Each fragment comes with an indication how long the council member had the floor. From this, it should be possible to calculate how fast council members speak.

The network of Dutch firms

21 September 2017 - One of the ways in which firms are linked is through board members who also sit on the boards of other firms. Researchers use these board interlocks to determine which firms occupy a central position in the corporate network. This «is widely considered as an indication of a powerful or at least advantageous position», Frank Takes and Eelke Heemskerk explain in an interesting paper on the subject.

Open company data in the Netherlands

6 August 2017 - Awkward: according to an Open Corporates ranking, the Netherlands is among the least transparant countries in Europe when it comes to company data. In many countries, the company register has been opened up as open data. Examples include the UK, France, Belgium, Romania, Bulgaria, Finland, Norway and Denmark (according to Open State).

Airbnb’s agreement with Amsterdam: some insights from scraped data

27 June 2017 - Airbnb is under fire. The platform would harm the liveability of Amsterdam neighbourhoods and drive up house prices. In December last year, Amsterdam and Airbnb signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to deal with abuses. According to Airbnb, the agreement is already bearing fruit. Airbnb thinks Amsterdam should focus its enforcement efforts on other platforms. But Amsterdam wants to introduce a registration requirement for holiday lettings, a measure Airbnb vehemently opposes.

Exploring traffic lights with location data from cyclists’ phones

22 December 2016 - In 2006, Amsterdammers voted Frederiksplein the location with the most irritating traffic light. Now, ten years later, data from the Fietstelweek (Bicycle Counting Week) offer a unique opportunity to map how much time cyclists lose at traffic lights.

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