After the voter revolt: Collaboration in the Amsterdam city council

The 21 March city council election saw a bit of a voter revolt. Four new parties got elected onto the city council, thanks primarily to voters in the less affluent, peripheral parts of the city. The election outcome reflects Amsterdam’s social divide.

As a result, the composition of the city council changed considerably. So how are the established parties and the new parties getting along?

Before trying to answer that question, let’s have a look at collaboration in the previous city council. There was a left-wing majority in the council, but the government was relatively right-leaning. There was an effective opposition, with GroenLinks (Green Party) and PvdA (Social-Democrats) frequently collaborating to file motions and amendmends.

The chart below shows collaboration in the current city council. The city now has a more left-leaning coalition of GroenLinks, D66, PvdA, and SP. The pattern of collaboration has changed considerably.

The chart suggests that there are three clusters in the city council. One contains the coalition parties GroenLinks, D66, PvdA, and SP. The second contains right-wing / conservative parties VVD, CDA, FvD and PvdO. And the third contains DENK, BIJ1 and ChristenUnie. PvdD (Party for the Animals) appears to be a bit of an outsider by this measure.

Opposition

Are opposition parties able to exert influence, despite their divisions? An interesting measure is whether they succeed in getting proposals adopted despite a part of the coalition voting against. So far, this has happened twice.

One case was a motion from Diederik Boomsma (CDA), asking to provide parking permits to people who have a private garage but have turned it into something else. Coalition party GroenLinks voted against, arguing that people who have made the decision to use their garage for other purposes are now turning to the city to solve their parking problem.

The second one was a motion from Sylvana Simons (BIJ1) asking to the local government to support teachers in their fight for fair wages. PvdA voted against, arguing that the alderwoman had already taken a stand.

The motions can be downloaded here, and here’s a Python script to process them.

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